Gluten Free Boiled Pudding or To Make a Dry Oatmeal Pudding

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Yay a gluten-free pudding recipe! Well for those who are gluten-free and not also sensitive to oats.

Suet is the only ‘moisture’ in the recipe. It doesn’t even call to soak the dried fruit first. If it didn’t take 4 hours to cook it would be an incredibly simple recipe.

This is a heartier recipe than my other pudding recipe “Raspberry Steamed Pudding“. And made a lot less mess.

To make a dry Oatmeal Pudding. Take your Oatmeal well picked, and put into it a little salt, some Raisins and Currants, and some beaten spice, and good store of Beef Suet finely shred, so tie it up hard in a Cloth, and let your water boil when you put it in, and let it boil very well; if you would butter it, then leave out the Suet; and if you would leave out the Fruit, then put in sweet herbs good store. Hannah Woolley, The Queen-like Closet OR RICH CABINET Scored with all manner of RARE RECEIPTS FOR Preserving, Candying and Cookery (1670)

Ingredients

  • 3 cups large oat, wheat free, oatmeal
  • pinch salt
  • 3/4 cup of raisin
  • 3/4 cup currants
  • 1 cup suet (or butter)
  • A good book

Directions

  1. Fill two pots of water 3/4 full. Put pots of water on high to boil. (Or one large pot and a teakettle).
  2. Mix ingredients together, carefully making sure the fruit and suit are evenly distributed.
  3. Place oatmeal mixture on a piece of fabric large enough for the task and tie up the ends. Wrap a string around and tie several times, leave one end long. Tie the loose end on to the middle of a cooking spoon, this will support the ball that is the pudding.
  4. Once water is fully boiling slowly lower bag of oatmeal mixture to submerge. Turn heat down to medium-high. Rest spoon across the top of the pot to keep the pudding off the bottom (where it will burn). Set oven timer for 4 hours.
  5. Get out the good book because you can’t leave the pudding unattended.
  6. Every 30 minutes add more hot water from the second pot to the first, to insure that the bag of oats is always covered, and always floating off the bottom.
  7. After four hours set pudding aside in a bowl until its cool enough to touch.
  8. Untie pudding, and open the bag over the edges of the bowl. Place a plate over the opened pudding. Upend bowl with pudding in it onto the plate. Unwrap pudding.
  9. Serve warm or cool.

The pudding doesn’t call for a ‘sauce’ but butter and sugar sauce would probably suit this pudding. (Or ice cream….shhhhhh)

Raspberry Steamed Pudding

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Since there are 100rd recipes on line for Cambridge pudding I decided to go a different steamed pudding route with this Raspberry Pudding.

I learned from a very unreliable source that Raspberries are an old world fruit that was cultivated in the new world. I’m going to have to dig out some more medieval or Tudor era recipes.

This recipe makes a firm custard not a rock hard cake.

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To make a Rasberry Pudding. Take a Quart of Cream and boil it with whole Spice a while, then put in some grated Bread, and cover it off the Fire, that it may scald a little; then put in eight Eggs well beaten, and sweeten it with Sugar; then put in a Pint or more of whole Rasberries, and so boil it in a Cloth, and take heed you do not boil it too much, then serve it in with Wine, Butter and Sugar Hannah Woolley, The Queen-like Closet OR RICH CABINET Scored with all manner of RARE RECEIPTS FOR Preserving, Candying and Cookery (1670)

Ingredients:

  • 4 cups of cream (half-and-half)
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 1 small chunk of dried galingale
  • 4 cups bread crumbs (takes 8 slices of bread dehydrated to make crumbs)
  • 8 eggs, beaten with whisk
  • 1/2 cup raw cane sugar
  • 2 cups raspberries

Sauce:

  • 1 cup wine
  • 2 tbsp butter
  • 1/2 cup raw cane sugar

Directions:

  1. Fill two pots of water 3/4 full. Put pots of water on high to boil. (Or one large pot and a teakettle).
  2. Put cream and spices into a sauce pan on medium high. Bring cream mixture up to close to a boil, until there are bubbles around the edge of the pot. Taste-test to make sure the cream has absorbed the spices.
  3. Using a slotted spoon fish the spices out of the cream.
  4. Turn off heat to the cream but leave pot on hot element.
  5. Dump the bread crumbs into the cream, and stir well. Let the bread soften and expand in the hot cream.
  6. Slowly pour the eggs into the cream mixture, stirring constantly as your pour. Add sugar and stir. Add raspberries and stir.
  7. Slowly pour pudding mixture into a cloth bag for the purpose and tie up the top. Wrap a string around and tie several times, leave one end long. Tie the loose end on to the middle of a cooking spoon, this will support the ball that is the pudding.
  8. Once water is fully boiling slowly lower bag of oatmeal mixture to submerge. Turn heat down to medium-high. Rest spoon across the top of the pot to keep the pudding off the bottom (where it will burn). Set oven timer for 4 hours.
  9. Get out a good book because you can’t leave the pudding unattended.
  10. Every 30 minutes add more hot water from the second pot to the first, to insure that the bag of custard is always covered, and always floating off the bottom.
  11. After four hours remove pudding from boiling water and hang until water stops running from it. Set it aside in a bowl until it is cool enough to touch.
  12. Mix wine, butter and sugar in a sauce pan and heat mixture on medium-low. Stirring often until sugar is melted.
  13. Untie pudding, and open the bag over the edges of the bowl. Place a plate over the opened pudding. Upend bowl with pudding in it onto the plate. Unwrap pudding.
  14. Serve when cool, with sauce.

Roasted Chicken with Apples, Currants and Barberries

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Barberries look like goji berries, they taste like dried cranberries simmered in lemon juice. You can buy them (and verjuice)  at specialty groceries, like a Mediterranean Grocery Shop.

I again used my clay cooker to roast my chicken but you can use any roasting pan with a cover. Always cook chicken up to 165 F.

To bake chickins. First season them with cloves & mace, pepper and salt, and put to them currans and Barberies, and slitte an apple and cast synamon and suger upon the apple, and lay it in the bottome, and to it put a dish of butter, and when it is almost enough baked, put a little suger, vergious and orenges. Thomas Dawson, The Second part of the good Hus-wiues Iewell (1597)

Ingredients:

  • 2 apples cut into slices
  • 1/2 tsp cinnamon, ground
  • 1/2 tsp raw can sugar
  • 1 whole chicken
  • 1/2 tsp mace, ground
  • 1/2 tsp cloves, ground
  • 1/2 tsp pepper, ground
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1/3 cup butter

Stuffing:

  • 1/3 cup dried currants
  • 1/3 cup dried barberries
  • 1 apple cored and coarsely chopped

Sauce:

  • 1 tbsp raw cane sugar
  • 1 tbsp verjuice
  • 1/4 cup of sour orange juice

Directions

  1. Soak clay roaster for 15 minutes to hours
  2. Place apple slices onto the bottom of your clay roaster, cover with 1/2 tsp sugar and cinnamon.
  3. Mix stuffing ingredients, currants, barberries, and chopped apple together.
  4. Place chicken on top of the apple slices. Put stuffing mixture inside bird cavity. Sprinkle cloves, mace, pepper, salt over the top of the bird. Dab the butter all over the top of the bird.
  5. Place lid on the clay cooker and place into cold oven. Heat oven to 420 and bake chicken for 90 minutes, or until bird reaches 165 F, and legs or wings twist off easily.
  6. Mix 1 tbsp of sugar, verjuice, and orange juice together.
  7. Take cook bird out of oven and turn off oven, and close oven door. Gently pour sauce over chicken, recover and return to still warm oven until you are ready to serve.
  8. Serve with stuffing, sauce and drippings from pan.

A Discussion about Seville Oranges

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Seville orange, bitter orange, sour orange, or marmalade orange refers to a citrus tree (Citrus × aurantium) and its fruit.

If your medication requires you to avoid grapefruit juice, it is also recommended you should also avoid Seville orange juice.

Seville orange juice tastes closer to lemon juice than sweet orange juice. I would substitute 3 parts lemon juice to one part orange if you can’t get bitter oranges.

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Clemintine, Seville orange, and a regular orange

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Seville oranges are not as pulpy as the modern orange.

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With a sample size of 1, I got 1/4 cup of juice and about 1/3 cup of seeds from one Seville orange.

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With a sample size of 1, I got almost 2/3 cup of juice from a regular orange.

Salmon Pastries or To bake a ioll of fresh Salmon

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I wanted to find a fish recipe to make for Christmas Eve, one of the few fish days that have continued to modern times.

The following recipe tells one to bake a salmon in the oven for 2 hours. I am making small hand pies and not an entire salmon. Salmon cooking times are usually around  4 to 6 minutes per half-inch of thickness–if you were not wrapping it in pastry. While high-quality salmon can be eaten raw, it is dry and chewy if over cooked. Its recommended that salmon be cooked until its temperature reaches 145 F.

To bake a ioll of fresh Salmon. TAke Ginger and salt, and season it, and certaine Corrans, and cast them about and vnder it, and let the paste be fine, and take a litle Butter and lay about it in the paste, and set it in the Ouen two houres, and so serue it in. The good Huswifes Handmaide for the Kitchin  (1594)

Ingredients:

  • 1 100g piece of salmon per person
  • enough pastry to wrap each piece
  • 2 tsp of butter
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger, ground
  • 20 currents
  • pinch of salt

Directions
1) Pre-heat oven to 350.
2) Lay out pastry and rub it with butter.
3) Spread out 1/2 tsp of ginger and salt on top of the butter.
4) Put 10 currents down on one half of the pastry. Place piece of salmon on top of the currents, then place 10 currents on top of salmon.
5) Using water to stick pastry edges together wrap the pastry around the salmon.
6) Brush top of pastry with butter and then bake pastry for 40 minutes, until pastry is golden and internal temperature reaches 145. Serve hot.

Fancy Pear Tart for the Holiday Party or A Baked Mete

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I was flipping through the bible “Take a Thousand Eggs or More” by the goddess, Cindy Renfrow, and needed to find a recipe worthy of the precious beef marrow I’d saved from making something else. Her recipe on page 191 called “A Baked Meat” seemed like a great place to start.

Pears set in a yellow custard. You also make use of the strainer technique to smooth out the custard.

My recipe deviates from the one by Renfrow but it does so with respect.

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A bake Mete. Take an make fayre lytel cofyns; than take Perys, and 3if they ben lytelle, put .iij. in a cofynne, and pare clene, and be-twyn euery pere, ley a gobet of Marow; and yf thou haue no lytel Perys, take grete, and gobet ham, and so put hem in the ovyn a whyle; than take thin commade lyke as thou takyst to Dowcetys, and pore ther-on; but lat the Marow and the Pecy3 ben sene; and whan it is y-now, serue forth…

Doucete3. Take Creme a gode cupfulle, and put it on a straynoure; thanne take 3olkys of Eyroun and put ther-to, and a lytel mylke; then strayne it thorw a straynoure in-to a bolle; then take Sugre y-now, and put ther-to, or ellys hony forde faute of Sugre, than coloure it with Safroun; than take thin cofyns, and put in the ovynne lere, and lat hem ben hardyd; than take a dysshe y-fastenyd on the pelys ende; and pore thin comade in-to the dyssche, and fro the dyssche in-to the cofyns; and when they don a-ryse wel, take hem out, and serue hem forth. (England, 1430)

Ingredients:
* 2 9″ pie shells
* 5-6 small bosc pears, washed, halved, cored
* 4 tbsp beef marrow
* 1.5 cups whipping cream
* 4 egg yolks
* 3 tbsp honey
* 2 pinches of saffron

Directions
1) Preheat oven to 350.
2) Place pear halves cut-face down, stem side in the middle with the round bottoms around the edge like a flower in both tart shells. Distribute the marrow around the pears in each pie. Bake for 25 minutes, until tart is browning, and marrow is sizzling.
3) Stir together cream, yolks, honey and saffron then, while stirring, pour through a pasta strainer into a larger bowl. Divide into two parts.
4) Pour cream mixture slowly into each pear tart, careful not to fully submerge the pear bottoms completely. Bake on 350 for 30 minutes, until custard sets and pears are cooked through.
5) Serve cold.

Quince Tart without a cover

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This is a slightly different tart from the Quince Tart from last week. I still had quinces left over from Sauce Madame to use up. Really I still have sauce madame to use up too, the recipe makes a lot of sauce.

This recipe calls to mix quince and apple (or pears) . Quince are pretty high in pectin so I am not sure if it is a flavour suggestion or a pectin suggestion, although it would help a tart without eggs slice more easily.

According to Know Your Humours web site by Agnes de Lanvallei quince are cold and dry, apples are moist, wine is hot and dry, sugar is hot and moist. If you were cooking to balance humours this combination makes sense as well. Wardens are also moist.

If you are exploring quince, A Book of Cookrye by A. W has several different variations on quince tarts and pies to try.

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Tartes of quinces without covers. Straine your quinces with some wine, when they be boiled tender, and an apple with them, or two or three wardens, straine them and season them with Sugar, sinamon and Ginger, and so make tarte without a cover. A Book of Cookrye by A. W. (1591)

Ingredients
* 3 large quince, roughly chopped
* 1 large apple
* 1 cup white wine
* 1/2 cup raw cane sugar
* 1 tsp cinnamon, ground
* 1 tsp ginger, ground
* 1 tart shell

Directions
1) Place quince, apple, and wine in a sauce pan and then add enough water to cover. Place pot on medium low and simmer contents for 1 hour, or until quince are soft enough to break apart.
2) Strain off the water, then set fruit and strainer aside to cool enough to handle.
3) Force cooled fruit through the strainer into a clean bowl, leaving behind the skins and cores in the strainer. I use a potato masher to help force the fruit through. This will create a smooth fruit slurry with the fruit expelled from the bottom of the strainer.
4) Preheat oven to 350.
5) Mix sugar and spices in the quince-apple paste. Pour mixture into tart shell and bake for 1 hour or until tart is brown and mixture is thickened . Serve once cooled.